Research shows that arrest, detention, and juvenile court adjudication and commitment tend to impact youth psychosocial development and maturation negatively, resulting in the potential of increased recidivism. In response, the nation has shifted from an incarceration-heavy approach toward juvenile offenders to one that tries to divert them from the criminal justice system to support and rehabilitative services instead. Of the multitude of juvenile diversion models, pre-arrest diversion led by law enforcement—often referred to as deflection—has received relatively little attention compared to other forms of diversion. Juvenile deflection helps youth avoid the trauma and stigma of the juvenile justice system as well as the burden of delinquency records that can be detrimental to future educational and employment opportunities. Further, these innovative programs are yielding positive results in terms of public safety and fiscal policy.

R Street and key experts recently held an in-depth conversation on juvenile deflection. Learn about different juvenile deflection models, levels of state support, best practices and outcome evaluation. This panel is for law enforcement, prosecutors, municipal and county managers and elected officials, reform allies and anyone else working in juvenile and criminal justice.

Panelists:

● [Moderator] Lisel Petis, Senior Fellow, R Street Institute
● Melissa W. Nelson, State Attorney for Florida’s Fourth Judicial Circuit
● Jac A. Charlier, Executive Director, TASC’s Center for Health and Justice and Executive Director, Police, Treatment, and Community Collaborative
● Cara Evans-Patterson, Diversion Program Manager, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department
● Jacquita Monroe, Senior Associate, Juvenile Justice Strategy Group, Annie E. Casey Foundation

This event was held on Sept. 27, 2022 at 1:00 PM ET.