From Utility Dive:

“I think in the same way that a growth forecast that was issued in May of 2008 for the next year is not going to be very accurate… any sort of forecast that came out in the last year for 2020, you can’t really put a lot of stock in it.”

“You’ve got to throw out any growth projection from before the outbreak, because everybody is going to be thinking quite differently now than they were a couple of months ago, both on the supply and on the demand side,” according to Josiah Neeley, senior fellow of energy policy at the R Street Institute.

While there are still many unknowns about COVID-19 — including whether it could recede during the summer months —​ “I think in the same way that a growth forecast that was issued in May of 2008 for the next year is not going to be very accurate … any sort of forecast that came out in the last year for 2020, you can’t really put a lot of stock in it,” he told Utility Dive.